Tenor

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Tenor
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General Info
Founded by Devvon Muro
Founded in 12AA
Industry
  • Nanotechnology
  • Cybernetics
Headquarters New Shanghai
Key people Devvon Muro (CEO)
Uniforms
Tenor Uniform.jpg
Tenor is a manufacturer of nanobots and cybernetics known for obsessive attention to detail and safety in its products. The company is named for a pioneering hacker and close friend of founder Devvon Muro, who died while using an untested enhancement of his own design.

Muro began his career as a young intern working on the initial series of Nanoblood infusions just after the Awakening. He became part of a group of hardware and software specialists who experimented wildly to discover the brave new world that this nanotechnology made possible. Despite warnings about safety risks from their peers and authority figures, Muro and his friends continued to test new products on themselves with few to no safety precautions. Convinced that their technology was essentially safe and that bold risks were necessary for progress, the group's experimentation grew steadily more daring.

That all changed with the death of their organizer, a precocious hacker who went by the name of Tenor. Tenor was killed while using an enhancement of his own design, which had undergone no safety testing prior to his own use of the product.

Muro was devastated by the death of his closest friend, and the group of explorers quickly disbanded in the wake of their leader's death. Tormented by guilt at failing to stop Tenor's fatal experiment - or the unsafe practices that led to it - Muro resolved to create a company to honor his friend's legacy. Using the profits from selling equipment that had once belonged to Tenor, Muro founded a company by the same name. For years, he dedicated its efforts to correct the fatal mistake that had killed his friend.

By building on experimental nanobots originated by Tenor, Muro was able to develop a safe product line with capabilities leaps and bounds ahead of anything the competition could muster. Only after testing the bots on himself did Muro release the company Tenor's first products to the market.

The cost of these bots was astronomical, but the obsessive attention to detail, security and safety ensured that Tenor products were in high demand. As an added safety measure, to this day the company runs its own chain of clinics where Nanoblood procedures and cybernetic upgrades can be performed.

In the initial years of Tenor's sales to the public, Muro demanded that every single cybernetic implant or improved nano-bot be tested on him before being released to the public. In addition to standing firm in his own conscience, he hoped to set an example of what safety processes should look like for other makers of products with potential health effects.

As the company grew exponentially, this became more and more a constraint as these tests became bottlenecked at a single person. In the face of overwhelming pressure from all parts of the organization, Muro finally relaxed this final safety check.

Instead of all new products being tested on Muro himself, Tenor's new policy requires that new products be tested on the project leads and at least one member of the company's board before public release. This simple but exacting check guarantees excruciating attention to the quality and safety of all Tenor technologies.